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FAQ for Tokyo Marui Hi-Capa, 2011, 1911, MEU & Detonics type variants

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Old November 30th, 2009, 11:24   #1
ILLusion
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FAQ for Tokyo Marui Hi-Capa, 2011, 1911, MEU & Detonics type variants

FAQ for Tokyo Marui Hi-Capa, 2011, 1911, MEU & Detonics type variants

NOTE: THIS THREAD IS NOT FOR ASKING WHERE TO GET THESE GBB'S. DO NOT POST IN HERE ASKING WHERE TO GET THESE PISTOLS IN CANADA!


On a daily basis, I get at least two new messages in my inbox about upgrading Tokyo Marui Hi-Capas, M1911A1, 2011, MEU, Detonics and other 1911 style variants.

On that same daily basis, I generally have at least three other ongoing message threads regarding the same topics.

Many of the questions that I'm asked are the same thing. The most common one is "what are the best things to upgrade?"

I figured I might as well create this thread so that discussions can be kept public - that way, I don't have to answer the same things over and over again.

Frequently asked questions in this thread will be edited in to the beginning posts in to a FAQ.

There is nothing wrong at all to continue asking questions that have been asked, if you need more clarification on a topic.

So go ahead, guys: Ask away. This is the spot. Just don't ask about clones. My experience with them is limited, and well... my experience with them also tells me to stay away from them if you don't want headaches and poor performance. That's why I don't spend too much time with them. If you ask a question about clones in here, expect my response to be to tell you to buy a Tokyo Marui product.

Cheers,
Brian


Table of Contents

Post #2... Frequently Asked Questions

Post #3... List and Description of Performance Characteristics

Post #4... Troubleshooting

Last edited by ILLusion; January 28th, 2010 at 17:27..
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Old November 30th, 2009, 11:24   #2
ILLusion
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FAQ

Q1: Which should I get? A Hi-Capa 4.3? Or a Hi-Capa 5.1?
A1: That depends on what you want to use it for, and what you're willing to sacrifice for certain benefits of the chosen pistol.

4.3 Pros:
  • Shorter overall length allows easier handling
  • Fixed rear sight is more robust due to no moving parts for greater durability
  • Single sided safety lever and shorter beavertail tang provides a lower drag profile
  • Shorter (lighter) slide requires less time to cycle and requires less gas to cycle than the 5.1
  • Integrated lanyard loop so you won't lose your pistol on the field.

4.3 Cons:
  • Shorter barrel does not achieve as high velocity or accuracy as the 5.1
  • Fixed rear sight can not be adjusted to compensate for windage or elevation deviations for more precise shooting
  • Single sided safety lever is not "lefty friendly", or not ideal for competitive shooting where the shooter is required to shoot with left hand only. This is fixable, through the purchase of ambidextrous safety levers. It is not a difficult upgrade.

5.1 Pros:
  • Longer barrel provides higher velocity and accuracy than the 4.3
  • Longer overall length provides easier natural pointability
  • Adjustable rear sight can be adjusted to compensate for windage or elevation deviations for more precise shooting
  • Ambidextrous safety levers allow versatility to operate the pistol with either hand.

5.1 Cons:
  • Longer overall length may make the gun a bit more cumbersome to manipulate and handle than the 4.3
  • Adjustable rear sight has many small parts in it that can potentially break
  • Longer (heavier) slide takes a bit more time to cycle and requires a bit more gas to cycle (not really noticeable with the stock plastic slide.)

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Q2: How do I disassemble "such-and-such" part? How do I disassemble the Hi-Capa?
A2: Watch this video:

YouTube - Tokyo Marui Hi-Capa Disassembly

This is a complete disassembly of a Tokyo Marui Hi-Capa 5.1 down to almost every last piece. Single stack series TM based pistols (such as the 1911 / MEU / Detonics / etc) follows similar basic concepts.

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Q3: How do I assemble "such-and-such" part? How do I assemble the Hi-Capa?
A3: Watch this video:

YouTube - Tokyo Marui Hi-Capa Assembly

This is a complete disassembly of a Tokyo Marui Hi-Capa 5.1 down to almost every last piece. Single stack series TM based pistols (such as the 1911 / MEU / Detonics / etc) follows similar basic concepts.

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Q4: I want to use a silencer... I'd need a threaded barrel. What can you tell me about that?
A4: If you want a metal threaded outer barrel, all of the existing mass produced threaded barrel products:
- Are difficult to source
- Causes a mechanical hindrance which results in anything from cycling issues to excessive gas consumption to physical damage/excessive wear to your slide.

The latter is due to the way a traditional barrel functions and what happens when a weight (the suppressor/tracer) is attached to the muzzle. The result of a tilting barrel combined with a heavy object on the muzzle, will shift the balance of the barrel, and cause the top of the chamber to bear a lot of pressure against the underside of the slide. A hard friction against the moving slide doesn't bode well for reliability, function and gas efficiency.

Because of the lack of a "proper" product on the market, ILLusion Kinetics has developed an outer barrel that is fixed, does not tilt and you could attach silencers on your pistol and it would still fire fine.

The threaded portion is actually machined to the muzzle of the barrel, so it's rock solid and can be machined in any thread size you want. The generic size is 14mm-.

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Q5: What is "LDC"? What is a "Long Dust Cover" versus a "Short Dust Cover"? What is the "Dust Cover"? What's the difference between a 5.1 LDC and a 4.3?
A5: "LDC" = Long Dust Cover. It refers to the frame's dust cover (the front/muzzle portion of the frame... it acts as a cover to keep dust out of the internals.)

Here is an example photo of the differences:





The top version is standard Marui Hi-Capa 5.1, with a standard "short" dust cover type frame, with scalloping in the muzzle of the slide to mate with the end of the short dust cover.

With an "LDC" setup (like the 4.3 and the 5" on the bottom), you'll notice that besides the longer dust cover on the frame, there are also no scalloped cuts in the slide. It is what we call "block cut" to mate with an LDC frame.



Ultimately, it is up to you to decide how you want to configure it... some people like the look of a block cut slide on a short dust cover frame, or the look of a scalloped slide on a long dust cover frame, but purists will scream bloody murder if you do such a thing. There ARE real steel manufacturers that mix it up on occasion, but it's generally rare to find an not preferred since snag points are created at the muzzle end of the slide (due to the overhanging corners.) Mixing a block cut slide on to a short dust cover frame can cause damage to the bottom corners of the slide at the muzzle and/or can damage your holster as well as create difficulty in holstering the pistol. This is why scalloping exists on slides.

Reversing the parts, putting a scalloped slide on a long dust cover frame can build up dust/dirt/grit around the scalloping where it meets the frame. This would tend to be counterproductive to the purpose of a dust cover.

For clarification:
Despite the 4.3 having a shorter barrel (4.3") than the 5.1 (5.1"), the Tokyo Marui Hi-Capa 4.3 actually has a LONGER dust cover than the Hi-Capa 5.1. Look again at the photos. The Tokyo Marui Hi-Capa 5.1 would have what's called a "Short Dust Cover", whereas the Hi-Capa 4.3 would have what's called a "Medium Dust Cover." A full block cut 5.1 would have a LONG dust cover - typically, these can only be found through aftermarket manufacturers, or by clone manufacturers (such as WE.)

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Q6: What parts can you swap?
A6: Pretty much EVERYTHING! Here is a basic list of items currently manufactured under the ILLusion Kinetics brand:
  • Frame (steel or aluminum, different lengths/shapes/colours)
  • Slide (steel or aluminum, custom designs/shapes/styles/colours/lengths)
  • Barrel (stainless steel, one piece, fixed for infinite durability of slide or tilting for realistic action, custom chamber engravings)
  • Sights (fibre optic, steel, fixed, adjustable)
  • Trigger (Aluminum, different shapes, different colours, adjustable pull length)
  • Trigger Stirrup (Stainless steel, adjustable pull length - combined with adjustable trigger can provide a 1mm trigger pull for competitive use)
  • Mag Catch (Stainless steel polished silver or black oxide steel, pre-centred for attachment of enlarged paddle)
  • Slide Catch (Stainless steel, different finishes, matte or polished)
  • Hammer (Steel, different shapes, lighter weight for faster lockup times, hardened surface and re-shaped hooks for smoother/lighter trigger pulls)
  • Hammer Strut (rigid hardened steel for faster lock up times and greater hammer response)
  • Sear (hardened surface and re-shaped hooks for smoother/lighter trigger pulls)
  • Sear Disconnect Lever (polished stainless steel for greater durability and smoother movement)
  • Valve Knocker (hardened steel for greater durability and more solid valve strikes)
  • Valve Knocker Disconnect Lever (polished stainless steel for greater durability and smoother movement)
  • Blowback Unit (light weight aircraft aluminum for faster slide cycling, integrated piston head for better air seal and shot to shot consistency)
  • Leaf Spring (stainless steel, provides lighter trigger pull)

And some other parts that are available from other manufacturers (I carry many of these as well):
  • Grip (different shapes, colours, sizes)
  • Beavertail (Grip) Safety (different shapes and styles, polished stainless steel or black oxide steel)
  • Safety Levers (different shapes and styles, single side or ambidextrous, polished or matte finish stainless steel or black oxide steel)
  • Slide Catch (different shapes and styles, single side or ambidextrous, polished stainless steel or black oxide steel)
  • Inner Barrel (different lengths, different bores, for greater accuracy and/or velocity)
  • Hop Up Rubber (improves seal/velocity/consistency/accuracy)
  • Loading Nozzle (greater durability)
  • Piston Head (better seal, improves gas consumption and cycling speed)
  • Titanium Screws (lighter weight)
  • Main Spring Housing (different sizes/shapes/finishes/colours)
  • Shock Buffers (increases durability of slide to frame contact, can short-stroke for faster cycling speed)
  • Floating Valve (increases velocity, shot consistency and improved gas consumption)
  • Floating Valve Blocker (greater durability)
  • Recoil Spring (increased cycling speed)
  • Main Spring (improved gas reliability)
  • Loading Nozzle Spring (replacement)
  • Floating Valve Spring (increased velocity)
  • Plunger Spring (replacement)
  • Valve Knocker Spring (replacement)
  • Valve Knocker Disconnect Spring (replacement)
  • Mag Catch Spring (replacement)
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Q7: What should I upgrade? What parts do you recommend I upgrade?
A7: Aesthetics are a personal preference, so for the sake of this guide, I will exclude aesthetic decision. I'm not going to pick what you wear for the day, so I won't tell you how your pistol should look.
However, the choice of performance parts is dependent on what performance characteristics you're after. This is, one of the most common questions asked, and the answer is as broad as the question itself. It comes down to "what performance characteristics would you like to improve?" And this will now segue in to the next section... Performance Characteristics...







.

Last edited by ILLusion; March 29th, 2011 at 17:44..
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Old November 30th, 2009, 11:25   #3
ILLusion
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CHARACTERITICS

The concepts discussed here are transferrable to ANY gas blowback gun, whether it's a pistol or a rifle, a 1911, a P226, an M4A1 or a SCAR. I'll refer to concepts more than to specific brand names of parts so that the contents here can be carried forward in time as the technology evolves and as product availability changes.




Accuracy:
The ability to consistently hit the same point of impact when fired at the same point of aim. The tighter the grouping, the better. Being able to consistently call your shot is what makes a gun "accurate" (shooter ability aside.)


Shot to Shot Gas Output Consistency:
This refers to the ability to maintain the same amount of gas output on every shot. The more consistent the volume output, the more predictable the shot becomes. This is a trait that works hand in hand with the above trait of "Accuracy".


Velocity / Power:
The power of the pistol directly translates to how fast the projectile will shoot. The faster a target shoots, the faster the shooter is able to register the hit. Moving targets will also require less lead distance, the faster your projectile moves. There are several ways to increase power at the muzzle, and generally involves increasing the volume of gas expelled as well as improving seals to prevent wasted gas for efficient usage. Increasing projectile weight will also increase projectile power at range (particularly with compressed gas powered guns.)


Blowback Power:
How hard the slide recoils on each shot. Hard blowback power can be a positive trait in recreating the feeling of firing a real gun and is generally done by increasing gas flow, as well as moving mass. Hard blowback power can also be a negative trait, as it increases muzzle flip, difficulty in following up shots, wasted gas, and slower slide cycling speed. In some instances (race guns, for example), lowering blowback power is required, as it allows for faster slide cycling speed and a more controllable muzzle for faster follow up shots.


Cycling Speed:
This refers to how fast the slide will cycle. It is desirable to achieve a fast cycling speed. The faster a slide/bolt cycles, the sooner the shooter is able to follow up with another shot. Cycle speed is affected in two phases: Rearward movement, and Forward movement.

Rearward movement refers to the cycle when the shot has left the barrel, and the slide begins its process of blowing backwards to recock the hammer, disconnect the trigger (in select fire semi auto mode), and chamber the next round. There are three minor characteristics in affecting the speed of rearward movement: Accelerating force, moving mass, and travel distance.

Accelerating Force refers to the driving force required to push the slide backwards. In gas guns, this is affected by the amount of gas pushing the slide back, as well as the gas pressure. The higher the gas pressure (and the volume), the faster the slide or bolt will blow backwards.

Moving mass refers to the weight of the slide or bolt. The lighter the mass, the faster it can accelerate. Acceleration is also affected by the gas, but the weight of the moving mass plays a greater role. The heavier the mass, the more power is required to accelerate it, and thus, the slower it will accelerate. This is why many race guns are lightened by milling out ports and holes in the slide, as well as the installation of super light weight componentry in the slide.

Travel distance refers to the overall distance required for the slide or bolt to travel before it ends the rearward cycle and begins the forward cycle. The shorter the movement distance, the less time is required to complete the cycle. High end performance race guns are typically "short stroked" to reduce the travel time of the slide or bolt. The downside to this, is that it can result in disabled mechanical features (slide/bolt lock is typically the trade off).


Forward movement refers to the cycle when the slide or bolt begins to re-enter battery. Similar to the rearward movement, this is affected by the same three minor characteristics, but the components that affect each trait is different. However, there is a fourth characteristic added, which is rebound rate.

Rebound rate is an additional sub-trait in this regard, and refers to the split second when the moving mass collides with its stop and how the two parts interact with each other under Newton's third law of motion: For each and every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction. The faster the mass is able to bounce back forward, the greater the assistance in accelerating the mass forward in to battery. In high performance race pistols, some shooters install high density urethane bumpers (also called "shock buffers") to literally bounce the slide forward. Some users even go as far as to place a spring in place, which increases the rebound rate even more, as urethane has a tendency to absorb power (can be desirable for reducing muzzle flip.)

Accelerating force, refers to the major driving force in pulling or pushing the slide or bolt forward back in to battery. In most guns (real or airsoft), this driving force is a recoil spring (also called a buffer spring.) Some springs PULL the mass forward, but in most cases, the springs PUSH the mass forward (as in an AR-15 or a 1911).

Moving mass refers to the weight of the slide or bolt. Again, the lighter the moving mass, the less energy is required to bring it up to maximum speed, and the faster it will reach its maximum speed. This is another reason why high performance race guns have lightened slides and componentry - for quick returns to battery.

Finally, travel distance plays the same role - the less distance required to travel before returning to battery, the faster the cycle completes.


Muzzle Control:
Lightweight: provides faster/easier control & pointability. Muzzle flips higher/faster.
Heavyweight: More stable pointability, but may be slower to get on target and requires more force to counter over-movement. Heavier muzzle reduces muzzle flipping for faster follow-up shots (double-taps.)


Durability:
This refers to how "tough" components are. The longer a component lasts, the more reliable the overall gun becomes.


(Effective) Range:
This refers to the effective range of the projectile - how far the gun is able to shoot with a predictable flight trajectory. This particular trait is a characteristic trait built up on a few other traits, such as velocity, trajectory, and the projectile weight. Increasing the projectile weight increases effective range. However, lighter projectiles will yield a higher velocity and can potentially have a LONGER range, although it may not be an effective range due to the scattering effect of lighter weight projectiles at long ranges - especially in windy conditions.


Trajectory:
Trajectory refers to the predictable flight pattern of the projectile, and is mainly controlled by the inner barrel and the hop up rubber/system. Smooth bore barrels tend to cause a projectile to drop with distance, forcing the shooter to "lob" shots in at long ranges. Hop up is an airsoft technology designed to counteract this effect by causing the BB to backspin, and thus, lift upwards to increase range. In fact, a properly adjusted hop up will rise just ever so slightly, before dropping. On the other hand, the Tanio Koba "Twist" barrel will give a perception of a laser straight flat shot all the way through to the end of its effective range, after which, the shot will drop.


Trigger Pull Length:
This can be broken down in to three minor characteristics that combine together to affect trigger pull length, and each of these minor characteristics need to be looked at in order to understand how to speed up trigger response time:

1) Pre-Pull Take Up: This refers to the distance you need to pull the trigger before you get to the release stage that will cause the sear to disconnect from the hammer hooks. This is not adjusted via the leaf spring, but rather, by pulling back the distance of the trigger stirrup either by adding material to the front of it, or by adding material to the back of it where the sear disconnect lever contacts. In essence, you want to remove as much of the initial take up as you can from the trigger pull. Some shooters prefer to have it there, I do not. To me, it's wasted pull distance, but that's me. Individual shooters have individual preferences. Many shooters like to keep the take up there as a safety feature to prevent accidental discharge, as the second stage of pulling the trigger means you are releasing the sear from the hammer hooks. There is a balance on how much to take up. Too much, and the sear may not safely engage the hammer (resulting in unintentional full auto fire), OR, the sear disconnect lever won't have enough room to do its job.

2) Trigger Pull Backslop: This refers to the distance the trigger is allowed to continue pulling after the hammer hooks break from the sear. This is generally done via adjustable triggers that have a set screw in them. By lengthening this screw in to the pistol grip, it restricts how far back the trigger can be pulled. Too little, and there will be a lot of travel after the hammer breaks. Too much, and you won't be able to break the hammer. Again, the point is to remove unnecessary trigger travel distance.

3) Stage-2 Pull: This refers to the second stage of the pull on pistols like this. This is the definitive action that causes the sear to move and allow the hammer to break free. Only highly experienced 'smiths should be altering the stage of this pull, as an incorrectly angled hook can cause a very dangerous pistol that may result in accidental discharges from something as simple as bumping the pistol, dropping it, or it can even result in unintentional full auto fire. A hook that has been shortened too much can also do this if the angles are not correct. I won't go in to detail on how this is done, as I don't want people to start messing around with guns and making them unsafe. But if you understand what I'm saying thus far, then you should have the knowledge to change this characteristic.

Combined together, the above three minor characteristics will affect the length of the overall trigger pull. Experienced 'smiths can create a trigger pull that is less than 1mm in length. That'd be like tapping on an electronic switch.

Whenever doing any hammer work, PLEASE test fire many times WITHOUT ammunition loaded to ensure safety. The last thing I need is people accidentally discharging in safe zones because I put up information on how to make their gun "race ready." If anything, it could get you disqualified from a match quickly, if you do this type of work haphazardly.


Trigger Weight:
This can be broken down in to three minor characteristics that combine together to affect trigger weight, and each of these minor characteristics need to be looked at in order to understand how to speed up trigger response time:

1) Contact Friction: This refers to the amount of friction between all moving parts responsible for the release of the hammer when a trigger is pulled. Experienced smiths can go further and polish all contact surfaces, such as the sear, hook, disconnect lever, trigger stirrup, trigger, and even grip area where the trigger/stirrup contacts. The smoother the surfaces that move against each other, the less effort, energy, and thus; weight will be required to pull the trigger.

2) Trigger Reset Time: This refers to how fast the trigger springs back forward when you release weight on it. This is affected by the RIGHT most prong of the leaf spring. The further forward you have this prong, the faster the trigger will reset to the original condition. However, pushing it forward with greater weight will also mean an increased trigger pull weight. It is up to the tuner/'smith/shooter to decide where your balance is with this. If all movement points are extremely smooth and parts move effortlessly, not much weight will be needed to push the trigger back to reset.

3) Sear Reset Time: This refers to how fast the sear is able to safely and reliably catch the hammer when the slide blows back to cycle the next round. The shorter the hammer hooks are made, the faster and stiffer a sear must engage the hammer to avoid any accidental discharge. This is adjusted via the MIDDLE prong of the leaf spring. Bending it forward will increase the speed and tension the sear will engage the hammer hooks. However, pushing it forward with greater weight will also mean an increased trigger pull weight, as more effort will be required to break the sear clean. It is up to the tuner/'smith/shooter to decide where your balance is with this. If all movement points are extremely smooth and parts move effortlessly, not much weight will be needed to push the sear to engage the hammer hooks.

Combined together, the above three minor characteristics will affect the weight of the overall trigger pull. Experienced 'smiths can create a trigger pull that requires less than half a pound to break the hammer. Many 'smiths prefer not to make triggers this light, and you will almost NEVER find a duty/carry pistol with a trigger pull this light for safety reasons. This is dangerous, and should only be done by experienced 'smiths. Most duty pistols have a factory setting that is 4 pounds or heavier. Airsoft is significantly lighter than that.

Whenever doing any hammer work, PLEASE test fire many times WITHOUT ammunition loaded to ensure safety. The last thing I need is people accidentally discharging in safe zones because I put up information on how to make their gun "race ready." If anything, it could get you disqualified from a match quickly, if you do this type of work haphazardly.


Lock Up Times:
The speed at which the hammer goes from "cocked", to "hammer down" position. The faster this time, the less trigger lag is present.


Hammer Break & Predictability:
This is the ability to feel the hammer break. Stiff components aid in being able to feel the movement of the sear against the hammer hooks. High performance race guns will have rigid aluminum triggers, hardened trigger bows and trigger disconnect levers - all of which are connected to the sear and hammer. As the trigger is pulled, the feeling is translated through the entire system in to the pad of the shooter's trigger finger. The shape of the trigger's contact point can also affect this feeling, and can come down to user preference. Being able to predict the break of the hammer will aid in reducing shooting problems such as anticipation, pulling, and jerking.


Reload Speed:
This refers to how fast the shooter can complete a reload cycle. The reload cycle of the magazine consists of two phases: Ejecting the spent mag, and inserting a fresh mag.

Ejecting a spent mag can be broken down in to three sub traits: the ability to access the mechanism required to release the magazine, the strength required to engage the mechanism, and the speed that the magazines takes to clear the well.

The ability to access the mechanism required to release the magazine is why competition shooters have enlarged or extended mag catch buttons. These also help because the shooter does not have to change their shooting grip to engage the mechanism, so readjustment is less required once they're ready to get back up on target. The bigger the mechanism, the harder it is to miss.

Almost all magazine catch mechanisms are self powered by a spring of some sort. Heavier springs require more effort to extract the magazine. Lighter springs require less effort and time to disengage, but run the risk of having the magazine accidentally release under recoil force. A balance must be played to determine spring strength.

The speed that the magazine takes to clear the well is the final trait. Most magazines should be able to fall clear of the well under the power of gravity. Some extreme shooters may even go so far as to insert a spring mechanism inside the gun to forcefully eject the spent magazine out, but chances are, the shooter isn't able to produce a fresh magazine fast enough to require such extreme methods. Polished magazines and wells aid in reducing friction.

Inserting a fresh magazine can also be broken down in to three sub traits: the ability to reach the magazine in to the mouth of the magwell, the speed & strength required to insert the magazine, and finally, chambering the next round.

The ability to access and produce a fresh magazine is actually the first stage of inserting a fresh magazine, however, this is dependent on the shooter's gear and their training technique. It actually has very little to do with their pistol, so I won't discuss it too much here.

The ability to reach the magazine to the mouth of the magwell refers to the ability to find the mouth and prepare the magazine for the next stage of insertion. High performance race guns feature flared/enlarged magwells to make it easier to guide the magazine in to the magwell. The larger the magwell, the less effort is required to find the mouth.

The speed and strength required to insert the magazine can be affected by any friction along the path of insertion. Again, this is why high performance race guns have polished magazines and flared magwells. Edges should be removed from the mouth to reduce any catch points, and to aid in guiding the magazine along the proper path.

Chambering a fresh round refers to the step following the magazine change, and assumes the reload was made on empty. Ideally, tactical reloads are made, which maintains a round in the chamber, and in this case, chambering a new round is unnecessary. However, in the case of an emergency reload where the gun has run empty, a fresh round is required. At this stage, the slide or bolt is typically locked back (unless the lock is disabled.) There are various devices available to allow the shooter to release the slide or bolt with ease, and it comes down to shooter preference. Some shooters prefer to hit the slide/bolt lock. Enlarged paddles/levers will make this easier and faster. Some shooters prefer to fully rack the slide or bolt - this tends to reduce wear between the slide/bolt and the lock.


Pointability:
Lightweight: provides faster/easier control & pointability. Muzzle flips higher/faster.
Heavyweight: More stable pointability, but may be slower to get on target and requires more force to counter over-movement. Heavier muzzle reduces muzzle flipping for faster follow-up shots (double-taps.)


Correction/Recovery:
The ability to follow up shots quickly after a shot.


Sight Picture (Clarity):
Refers to the brightness of the sight. Electronic optics, fibre optics, glow dots or fluorescent paint all help with this.


Target Acquisition (Speed):
The ability to swivel to another target. The heavier the muzzle of a gun, the more the shooter is likely to overswivel and require correction (swaying).


Grip Registration:
Placement of hand on the grip to allow controlability of the weapon.

Last edited by ILLusion; August 30th, 2013 at 02:26..
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Old November 30th, 2009, 11:25   #4
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TROUBLESHOOTING

Q1: When my slide cycles the next shot, the chambered BB rolls out the barrel. How can I fix this?
A1: Do one or both of the following:
  1. Turn up your hop up
  2. Clean excess lube off your hop up rubber
The force of your slide returning to battery is knocking the next round out of location. A loose or slippery hop up won't hold it in place.

Q2: I changed my grip, and now, my gun is firing in uncontrollable full auto and/or my hammer does not stay cocked back. OR, when I fire, the nub on the blowback unit gets caught on the hammer. The only way I can move the slide forward again is if I manually depress the hammer that's caught under the slide. What happened and how do I fix this?
A2a: This is the most common mistake made by a beginner disassembling their pistol. If the lower half of the pistol was disassembled such that the leaf spring became unseated, it's possible that the leaf spring was not installed properly. Re-seat it. It is difficult to see it when the beavertail (grip) safety is in the way, but all prongs should be "behind" the associated component and pushing it "forward" (towards the muzzle.) See this photo for a properly seated leaf spring: http://www.pbase.com/illusive_airsof...2/original.jpg
A2b: If your receiver and/or grip are worn such that they push apart from each other (the hammer spring pushes the two apart), then this can cause the sear to raise just high enough such that the middle prong of the leaf spring will slip under the sear and get caught on a lip on the bottom of the sear. Correct this by re-assembling the grip and receiver so that they sit closer together. MAKE SURE the leaf spring is NOT in place when you push the two parts together or you may damage the sear prong! If it is not possible to tighten the frame and grip together, use a small hobby file to remove the lip from the bottom of the sear. This will prevent the leaf spring's prong from getting caught on the bottom of the sear. With the lip gone, the prong should be able to slide back to it's proper place on the sear when required to do so. However, this method is not ideal, as it does not solve the root of the problem, and you may experience high gas consumption issues. If the receiver is away from the grip, then by extension, the slide/nozzle is further away from the magazine, and thus, a poor seal exists there.

Q3: When I fire my metal upgraded pistol (slide and barrel are metal), the slide seems to get stuck when it tries to return forward. When it gets stuck like this, the easiest way I can get the slide to return forward is if I hit the muzzle of the barrel inwards. What's happening and how do I fix it?
A3: Over time and use, a traditional tilting barrel eventually chews through the lugs in the slide that are used to engage the chamber and pull it back. Once the lugs are worn down and the slide can no longer reliably grab & pull the barrel back, the slide ends up getting caught on the top of the chamber, which dramatically increases the damage to the slide.

At this point, there are three solutions, but only two of them are reliable:
  1. The first solution is to get a replacement slide. If you are using a clone and you get a same replacement slide, this problem may happen again. If you get any other brand of slide, it may not play well with your barrel, AND/OR if you are able to get the slide to cycle the pistol properly, the barrel may again, chew up the lugs in the slide. This is not certain, but based on the lack of information in this area, and based on the prices of a quality aftermarket slide, it's best not to guess with this one.

  2. The second solution, is a two piece outer barrel system, pre-loaded with a spring - it's a custom modification that I figured out a couple of years ago before any other solutions were on the market. If you dig around enough, you may find some tutorials or pictures online of how such a setup looks. Basically, it is a two-piece barrel system, with a spring attached to the inner barrel and levers it against the chamber. The outer barrel just covers the assembly. The result, is that the natural state state of the outer barrel, is now to pull backwards, rather than rest in a neutral state. By doing so, the barrel & chamber does not rely on the slide's lugs to pull it back anymore, instead, the spring does this for the slide and the end result is a barrel that (on its own power) follows the slide back naturally. The downside to this, is that the slide's forward lug now bears the force of returning the barrel to battery AND pushing the spring forward at the same time. If this lug is still in perfect shape, then this shouldn't be an issue, but it WILL take more damage and break down faster. It shouldn't be too much worse, since the spring should only be light weight. However, if that lug is destroyed, then your only reliable option is the third solution...

  3. The third solution is ILLusion Kinetics fixed barrel, which offloads all contact that the slide makes with the barrel/chamber, which increases the slide life to an infinite level. Even a completely internally destroyed slide can function properly with this barrel set. The barrel does not move, it does not tilt or rock. It's stationary. The chamber top is lowered a slight bit, so that the slide just glides over the chamber cover. This type of barrel works with any brand of slide, regardless of its health.

Q4: There's a small problem with my trigger. When I rack the slide and don't slam it back into battery, the first pull of the trigger doesn't disconnect the hammer. I then have to pull the trigger again before the hammer disconnects. So basically every now and then when I shoot or rack the slide softly, I need to pull the trigger twice before the hammer is released. There is a click on the first trigger pull but nothing happens. What's the solution?
A4: Your first trigger press jiggles the lever in to place, which is why nothing happens, but on the second press, it functions.
If you're using an adjustable trigger stirrup, then back off the adjustment a bit. This will give more room for the disconnect lever to slip behind the sear.
If you're not using adjustable stirrup, then you just need to file a small ramp behind the sear to allow the trigger disconnect lever to slip behind the sear.

Last edited by ILLusion; December 12th, 2011 at 17:45..
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Old November 30th, 2009, 11:36   #5
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Let me start first,

I want to know if it's possible that the magwell on the hi-capa for SV grip would fit on the WA SV grip as well. Thanks in advance.

I apologize if that not related to your topic.

KND
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Old November 30th, 2009, 11:41   #6
ILLusion
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Originally Posted by KND View Post
Let me start first,

I want to know if it's possible that the magwell on the hi-capa for SV grip would fit on the WA SV grip as well. Thanks in advance.

I apologize if that not related to your topic.

KND
Hmm... I've never heard of anybody trying the other way, since it's generally WA pistols that have greater variety of parts, with users trying to fit WA parts on to Marui pistols.

Sorry, I'm not familiar with WA pistols much at all, and am not able to assist with this question.

Does anybody know the answer to this?
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Old November 30th, 2009, 11:43   #7
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Odds are that we'll be able to find out at either the next CAPS QS or the Year End Tourny.
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Old November 30th, 2009, 11:45   #8
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i think you should include a general breakdown of parts for different types of setups, that way, if people have any specific questions are parts, they can ask them. Here is what i mean:

High Speed Set Up:

Do a break down of everything YOU would do for a high-speed set up with the primary upgrades followed by the secondary and tertiary.

High Power Set Up:

etc.

This should answer most peoples basic questions on the parts they will need for each setup.

Just my 2 cents.
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Old November 30th, 2009, 11:53   #9
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Originally Posted by Donster View Post
i think you should include a general breakdown of parts for different types of setups, that way, if people have any specific questions are parts, they can ask them. Here is what i mean:

High Speed Set Up:

Do a break down of everything YOU would do for a high-speed set up with the primary upgrades followed by the secondary and tertiary.

High Power Set Up:

etc.

This should answer most peoples basic questions on the parts they will need for each setup.

Just my 2 cents.
Agreed.

Unseen to the general user, I have four reserved posts below the main post that are in the works a bunch of FAQs and different details on those types of setups, or more specifically, what theories I try to attain to reach different goals for different performance characteristics.

To be described, will be the many characteristics that pistols can have, what the purpose of that characteristic is, and what can be done to achieve the best performance from these characteristics. The two biggest characteristics that people almost always ask me about, are shot velocity/power, and accuracy. Falling far behind in terms of how frequently they're asked, are other characteristics such as cycling speed, pointability trigger jobs, reloading speed, muzzle control, target acquisition, draw speed, gear/equipment, etc etc. Some of these are picked up only through practice, but having the right equipment can aid or enhance the experience as well. These will be all discussed.

Listing specific parts is generally not too useful, as they change with time as new items hit the market or are developed. Discussing the characteristic and the techniques to achieve it are more important, as the theories can be carried through time. I can still discuss specific parts, as long as readers realize that the answers provided can be dated.

Last edited by ILLusion; November 30th, 2009 at 14:45..
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Old November 30th, 2009, 12:48   #10
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Illusion...sounds like you're aiming to put something similar to Skruface's "what to upgrade and what not" (something like that) for AEGs.

I've always found that write up to be extremely useful as a reference. Concepts of high-speed vs. high-torque remain constant regardless of tooth specifics, brands, etc...

If it's along those lines, it'll be very useful...if it's in plain english, it'll be widely accessible.

I only hope that you put in a highlighted note at the beginning of each post that reads:
"WARNING - monkeying around with perfectly working GBB is a great way to destroy it quickly"

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Old December 4th, 2009, 02:52   #11
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Maybe it's not really related but I'd like to know what would be a recommended holster for the Hi-Capa, one like the serpa holsters where your gun clips. I know that a generic fabric holster will fit but im looking for something more fitted. Any model that would work?
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Old December 4th, 2009, 03:02   #12
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Originally Posted by Doombringer View Post
Maybe it's not really related but I'd like to know what would be a recommended holster for the Hi-Capa, one like the serpa holsters where your gun clips. I know that a generic fabric holster will fit but im looking for something more fitted. Any model that would work?
1911 Serpas will work for a 5.1 Hicapa, with a slight modification to the trigger guard area of the holster because the stock Hicapa grip is squared off. Or just change to a Tanio Koba grip and you shouldn't have to modify it at all.
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Old December 4th, 2009, 09:07   #13
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Gear questions are perfectly valid for this thread as well, and are to be covered as well (sorry, been quite busy with work lately, and while the document has been started, I haven't been able to complete it yet.)

I'm not too knowledgeable on all the gear options out there, but I know what's worked for me and some others so far.

I know some users are able to fit their 4.3 Hi-Capa in to Serpa holsters by switching to Tanio Koba grips (as Styrak indicated) and by also chopping off the bottom of the holster, due to the block cut front end of the 4.3.

Also, if you have a 5.1 with an integrated rail frame with light mount attached, I've found that it will fit perfectly to a Safariland 6004 made for Springfield Operator / Kimber Warrior / etc with integrated light mount.

ie:



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Old December 4th, 2009, 09:27   #14
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^^ that holster works perfectly for a bonestock Hi-Capa as well. I actually find most Holster issue with Hi-Capa is the shape and width of the mid-frame rather than the squared trigger guard, since the frame is wider than regular 1911. But I would venture to guess anything made for a railed 1911 will negate that particular issue. If you have a frame that is as wide as the slide though(ie, installed a metal kit with different frame) you will be SOL in that regard, but then I am guessing your gun would not be used as a field piece anyway, and a IPSC type speed holster setup is what you want.

As far as that magwell question goes, I think there is little reason why they cannot be made to fit one or the other between WA and TM since that really is not a mechanically linked part. But I find that its not necessarily the best way since you probably can find dedicated TM/WA parts anyway. Also there are enough folks outthere who's fitted RS magwell to their piece as well(see the4thpower's amazing work as example).
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Old December 13th, 2009, 06:53   #15
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Since you have now start to sell your own line of parts in a retail format, will you be able to ship to the US and are you willing to assemble and able to ship semi constructed pistols?

Thanks,
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